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LAPAROSCOPIC INGUINAL
HERNIA REPAIR


GARTH H. BALLANTYNE, M.D., M.B.A
F.A.C.S., F.A.S.C.R.S.

BOARD CERTIFIED IN:
GENERAL SURGERY & COLON AND RECTAL SURGERY

OFFICE: 4 SHAW'S COVE, NEW LONDON, CT 06320

SURGEON IN CHIEF
LAWRENCE & MEMORIAL HOSPITAL
NEW LONDON, CT 06320

PRACTICE LIMITED TO LAPAROSCOPIC SURGERY


CONTACT US AT:
1-860-444-7675

This page last updated: September 11, 2010 11:55 AM

MORE ABOUT:
LAPAROSCOPIC INGUINAL HERNIA REPAIR

RANDOMIZED TRIAL

 

ROBOTICS IN
LAPAROSCOPIC HERNIA SURGERY
STAR-LEDGER, June 8, 1997


HOMECENTER (CALS)GERD (REFLUX)Rx OF GERDNISSEN FUNDO
Dr BALLANTYNECOLECTOMYHERNIA REPAIRGALLBLADDERALT MEDICINE

 

Each year about 600,000 hernia-repair operations are performed in the United States. Until recently, however, all were performed as traditional, "open" procedures requiring a large incision in the lower abdomen. The result was significant pain for patients.

Today, the minimally invasive technique of laparoscopic surgery can be used to repair the most common types of hernias. Although both traditional and laparoscopic hernia surgery are performed on an outpatient basis, patients treated laparoscopically seem to experience more rapid healing and far less pain during recovery. They can return to normal activity, including work, after only a few days, while recovery from traditional hernia repair can be a three- to five week process.

The laparoscopic approach can be used to repair direct and indirect inguinal (groin) hernias and femoral (below the groin) hernias. Some hernias located in other parts of the abdominal wall can be repaired laparoscopically as well.

Because laparoscopy requires extensive and specialized training, only a small number of surgeons throughout the country are qualified to perform these procedures. Dr. Ballantyne, at the Center for Advanced Laparoscopic Surgery at St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital Center, is one of them. The Center is equipped with the latest laparoscopic technology, including three-dimensional imaging equipment and the most advanced ultrasound instruments in use anywhere.

 

THE LAPAROSCOPIC SURGERY PROCEDURE:

A hernia occurs when the abdominal wall weakens and the inner lining of the abdomen pushes through the weakened area, forming a sac. To correct this problem, the surgeon's goal is to patch the abdominal wall in a way that will permanently strengthen it, precluding the possibility of another hernia later.

Minimally invasive surgery for hernia repair begins with three or four small incisions through which the surgeon inserts trocars-narrow, tube-like devices. Through one trocar, the surgeon inserts a laparoscope, which is a telescopic videocamera that provides a magnified view of internal anatomical structures. Surgical instruments for cutting and gripping are inserted through the other trocars. Dr. Ballantyne watches on a video monitor as he manipulates these instruments inside the abdomen.

In a laparoscopic hernia repair procedure, Dr. Ballantyne first pulls the hernial sac back into the abdominal cavity, exposing the defect in the abdominal wall. This weakened portion is then covered with a mesh patch. Laparoscopy allows Dr. Ballantyne to place and anchor the patch on the inside of the abdominal wall, taking advantage of the natural outward pressure of the abdomen to secure the repair and promote healing. (In contrast, the patch must be placed on the outside of the abdominal wall in the traditional open operation.)

Because a laparoscopic hernia repair is stronger than a repair performed traditionally, the hernia is less likely to recur. In fact, patients with a recurring hernia may find the laparoscopic approach necessary to permanently eliminate ruptures in that area of the abdomen.

Although most hernia procedures are performed under general anesthesia, in certain cases, patients can be operated on under regional anesthesia.

 

BEFORE SURGERY:

At the Center for Advanced Laparoscopic Surgery, patients are carefully evaluated to determine whether a minimally invasive hernia repair is the best approach for them. Our experience is that most patients benefit from laparoscopy; however, for some patients, the traditional procedure is recommended.

Once the operation is scheduled, St. Luke'sRoosevelt Hospital Center will evaluate your health and perform routine blood tests. Before the operation you will also meet with an anesthesiologist or nurse anesthetist who will ask questions about previous surgeries and explain the anesthesia procedure.

Because laparoscopic hernia repair is usually performed under general anesthesia, you cannot eat or drink anything after midnight the day before the surgery. You will be admitted to the hospital the same day as your surgery.

 

YOUR RECOVERY:

In the hours following your laparoscopic hernia operation, you will experience some pain from the small incisions your surgeon made to perform the procedure. Within three to five hours, you will be discharged from the hospital with a family member or other escort.

At home you will be able to take care of yourself. In two or three days, you can return to work and your normal routine. If you exercise, you can also resume a fitness program and sports competition. After a few months, the surgical incisions will be barely visible.

 

 


 MORE INFORMATION:
CALL 1-860-444-7675
or browse these other pages:

  • GARTH H. BALLANTYNE, M.D. - BACKGROUND AND TRAINING Dr. Ballantyne's background, training, academic career and clinical experience are outlined. In addition a full list of his PUBLICATIONS and LECTURES are inluded on linked web pages. Finally, the INSURANCE PLANS in which Dr. Ballantyne participates are indicated on another linked page.
  • LAPAROSCOPIC SURGERY - A new type of surgery that decreases the size of incisions used by surgeons that causes less pain and speeds recovery compared to traditionsl surgical techniques. It is also called Keyhole Surgery, Band Aid Surgery and Minimally Invasive Surgery
  • CENTER FOR ADVANCED LAPAROSCOPIC SURGERY - A new state of the art laparoscopic surgery center at a major university teaching hospital in Manhattan. Our Center is based at St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital Center which is a Teaching Hospital of Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons.
  • AN OVERVIEW OF LAPAROSCOPIC GASTROINTESTINAL SURGERY - Results and complications of diagnostic and therapeutic laparoscopy are regiewed. Topics include esophageal, gastric, hepatobiliary, small bowel and colorectal laparoscopic surgery procedures.
  • LAPAROSCOPIC COLECTOMY - Laparoscopic removal of a part of the colon for diverticulitis, colon cancer, rectal cancer, colorectal cancer, Crohn's Disease, Chronic Ulcerative Colitis, rectal prolapse, volvulus, sigmoid volvulus, cecal volvulus or constipation.
  • LAPAROSCOPIC CHOLECYSTECTOMY - Surgical removal of the gallbladder for gallstones, cholelithiasis, acute cholecystitis, chronic cholecystitis, choledocholithiasis, biliary colic or common bile duct stones.
  • LAPAROSCOPIC INGUINAL HERNIA REPAIR - Surgical repair of inguinal hernia, femoral hernia, double hernia, recurrent hernia, groin hernia, indirect hernia or direct hernia.
  • GASTRO-ESOPHAGEAL REFLUX DISEASE (GERD) - Hiatal hernia, heartburn, acid reflux, Barrett's esophagus, reflux esophagitis, or esophageal stricture.
  • THERAPY OF GASTRO-ESOPHAGEAL REFLUX DISEASE - Treatment of hiatal hernia, heartburn, acid reflux, reflux esophagitis, Barrett's esophagus or esophageal stricture.
  • SURGICAL TREATMENT OF GASTRO-ESOPHAGEAL REFLUX DISEASE - Selection of patients and selection of a surgeon for Laparocopic Nissen Fundoplication.
  • LAPAROSCOPIC NISSEN FUNDOPLICATION - Surgical repair of a hiatal hernia, acid reflux or heartburn.
  • WHICH IS ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE? TRADITIONAL WESTERN MEDICINE, MODERN EXPERIMETAL MEDICINE or LAPAROSCOPIC SURGERY.
  • Copyright 1996, Garth Hadden Ballantyne, M.D., P.C. All rights reserved.
    50 East 69th Street, New York, New York 10021 (212)-249-2626 or (800)-LAP-SURG